The Latest: California to appeal ruling on life-ending drugs

FILE - In this Sunday, July 24, 2016, file photo provided by Niels Alpert, Betsy Davis smiles during her "Right To Die Party" in Ojai, Calif. Davis threw herself the party as she became one of the first to use a California law to take her own life in 2016. Advocates say the terminally ill may die tougher deaths after a judge on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, threw out the law that allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs. (Niels Alpert via AP, File)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Latest on California's law allowing life-ending drugs (all times local):

10:35 a.m.

California's attorney general plans to appeal a Riverside County judge's ruling blocking a 2016 state law that allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement Wednesday that he will seek an expedited review in an appeals court.

He says he strongly disagrees with Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia's ruling Tuesday that lawmakers illegally passed the law during a special session devoted to other topics. The judge gave Becerra five days to appeal.

The law allows adults to obtain life-ending drugs if a doctor determines they have six months or less to live.

Opponents say it lacks safeguards to prevent abuses.

An advocacy group estimates that in its first year 504 Californians requested prescriptions for medical aid in dying.

___

11:15 p.m.

Advocates say the terminally ill may suffer unnecessarily after a judge threw out a California law that allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs.

Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia said Tuesday that lawmakers illegally passed the law during a special session devoted to other topics. The state attorney general has five days to appeal.

The law allows adults to obtain life-ending drugs if a doctor determines they have six months or less to live.

Opponents say it puts terminally ill patients at risk for coerced death and could become a way out for people who are uninsured or fearful of high medical bills.

Democratic Sen. Bill Monning of Carmel, who carried the original legislation, says there has been no reported abuse.

Must Read

Rare 4th-century mosaic of chariot race found in...

Aug 10, 2016

A Cypriot archaeologist says a mosaic floor dating to the 4th century has been uncovered depicting...

Police: Woman killed by Florida officer in...

Aug 10, 2016

A police "shoot/ don't shoot" demonstration went shockingly awry when an officer shot and killed a...

In setback for Brazil's Rousseff, Senate puts her...

Aug 10, 2016

Brazil's Senate has voted overwhelmingly to put suspended President Dilma Rousseff on trial for...

Image of Asia: Starting the hajj pilgrimage from...

Aug 10, 2016

Image of Asia: A man is greeted by relatives and neighbors as he leaves for the hajj from Srinagar...

Pokemon players not welcome at Cambodia's...

Aug 10, 2016

The game "Pokemon Go" is causing distress in Cambodia, where some smartphone-wielding players have...

About Us

The Daily Feeder, keep your life updated with the world’s most important political, business, and cultural news 24/7 like no any other news network can.

Contact us: sales[at]thedailyfeeder.com

Subscribe Now!